Lawson Tower Windows Restoration
$17,000
Approved - In Progress
Project Description
Lawson Tower
This project is part of the ongoing mission of the Scituate Historical Society to preserve the heritage of this town. The finials and windows will be inspected and painted. Lawson Tower is one of the most visited historic locations in town, and this project is important in ensuring its integrity.

This project fully meets the requirements of the Town’s CPC goals for historical resources by recognizing, preserving and enhancing the historical heritage and character for the Town’s current residents and future generations.


History
Lawson Tower is widely recognized as the most beautiful water tower in North America, standing 153 feet tall with 123 steps to the top. The tower was built in 1902 by multi-millionaire Boston businessman Thomas W. Lawson to cloak a 276,000-gallon water tank across from his "Dreamwold" estate, and added to the National Historic Register in 1976 (Structure #76001963). Lawson commissioned the Meneely Bell Company of West Troy, New York, to install ten bells at the top of the tower. These bells range in size from three hundred to three thousand pounds. This chime system was originally designed to be played either from the bell room eighty feet above the ground or on the console of the clavier room.

Lawson, a financier and author, built the tower in 1902 and the Scituate Water Co. stopped using the tank inside in 1988. The tower - listed as both an American Water Landmark in 1974 and to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976 - has become a popular touring site, featuring sweeping views of the South Shore, lighthouses and the nearby First Parish church.

“It’s the only structure of its kind in the United States,” said David Ball, president of the Scituate Historical Society. “It’s quite an experience to be up there when the bells are ringing. Most people have never experienced anything like it. And if you look carefully, you can see Provincetown on a very clear day.”
Photos (click on image to enlarge)
Map