Cudworth House
$17,100, $42,500 and $26,500
Completed Project
Project Descriptions
2004 Barn and Pound
$17,100
This project funded the rehabilitation of the Cudworth Barn and Pound, including replacement sills, siding, roof shingles and doors on the barn, and repairs to the stone walls and replacement of the gate on the adjoining animal pound.

Gate plaque reads: TOWN CATTLE POUND, Built 1671, Repaired 1781, Relocated & Rebuilt 1953

The pound was originally built in 1671 when the town "voted to give Samuel Clapp eight pounds for setting up a new pound." Any animals found straying were captured, placed in the pound and cared for by the poundkeeper until their owners retrieved them on payment of a small fee. The old specifications for the construction of a pound were that it be "horse high, bull strong, and hog tight." The pound was relocated next to the barn in 1953 when it was necessary to make room for an addition to the Gates School.
2006 Chimney
$42,500
This project funded the rehabilitation of the Cudworth House chimney.
2007 HVAC System
$26,500
In accordance with preservation requirements for collections in historic buildings, the Scituate Historical Society installed in the Cudworth House a minimal heating and air conditioning system (HVAC). This included a gas furnace, air conditioning coil and condensing unit, ductwork, carpentry, concrete pad, electrical support and the repair and painting of ceilings.
History
In 1797 Zephaniah Cudworth, a direct descendant of one of Scituate’s most illustrious citizens, General James Cudworth, built the house as it stands today, tradition says around an existing chimney. Zephaniah was Keeper of the Town Pound for many years. The house and surrounding acreage were conveyed to the Town in 1916 for the site of a new high school, now Gates School, and from that time until the 1980s it served as headquarters of the Scituate Historical Society. It holds a treasure trove of Town history such as the room dedicated to Chief Justice William Cushing, and on the hearth in the keeping room, a kettle forged by Mordecai Lincoln, ancestor of the President. Several years ago CPA funds amounting to about $68,000 were voted for renovations which included refinishing some of the original floorboards, rebuilding the chimney and installing heat and air conditioning. The house is only one of the historic building restorations made possible by the Community Preservation Act - we are grateful that the Town’s voters had the foresight to pass it.

Courtesy of The Scituate Historical Society
Photos (click on image to enlarge)
Map